James Fallows

James Fallows is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and has written for the magazine since the late 1970s. He has reported extensively from outside the United States and once worked as President Carter's chief speechwriter. His latest book is China Airborne.

The California High-Speed Rail Debate—Kicking Things Off

The Erie Canal. The transcontinental railroad. The Interstate Highway system. Big, expensive, controversial—and indispensable. Is the next one in this series a new rail network in our most famously freeway-centric state? 

Raj Shaunak and the Economic Boom in Eastern Mississippi

It's one thing to draw high-skill, high-wage jobs to a place that has historically lacked opportunities. It's something else altogether to find people qualified to fill them. A local answer to a national question.

Smaller Towns as Talent Magnets— the Chance to Make Things Work

"The kind of people who might have gone to NASA in the 1960s, Wall Street in the 1980s, or Silicon Valley in the late 1990s are now, I think, more likely than ever to work in municipal government." So says a well-educated young small-town mayor.  

Sunday Readings on Media, Sports, and War

Talk shows aren't bringing on Captain Hazelwood to discuss safe shipping. But they still can't get enough of the Hazelwoods of foreign policy. Also, whether the "New York Times paradox" applies to public radio.  

Richard Rockefeller, MD

What would you do, if you could do anything? An inspiring answer to that question.

The Endless Civil War Goes On

Northerners and Southerners, blacks and whites, grapple once more with the question of "what's the worst we will put up with?"